Global social media tracker 2012 – Wave 6 of Universal McCann’s study

Since 2006, media agency Universal McCann (UM) has annually surveyed active internet users across the globe on their use of social media. They define active internet users as people aged 16-54 who use the internet at least 3-4 days a week. They chose this group, because it is driving the adoption of social media platforms. While UM’s methodology has always stayed the same, they steadily increased the number of people surveyed. For their latest report, Wave 6, they got responses from 41,738 users in 62 countries, including 1,043 in Germany. A 74-page summary is downloadable for free. There is also a German version available.

I have written about UM’s earlier findings, in particular with a view on Germany,  and it’s interesting to see how the global use of social media has evolved since then. Over the last couple of years, we have observed the impressive growth of social media across the globe, with some significant differences between countries depending on their socio-economic environment. At first, the growth was triggered by an increasing number of specific activities such as blogging or video sharing with each activity having its own purpose for users. Over time, social networks in general and Facebook in particular emerged as the platforms where most users aggregated the different things they were doing on the internet. This trend continued in Wave 6, but as the social media universe matures and new devices for access emerge, we can see more differentiation in the way social media are being used. Here is what I took away from Universal McCann’s latest report.

Less profiles, more contacts

Exhibit 1: Percentage of active internet users managing a profile on an existing social network such as Facebook within the last 6 months. Wave 3 (2008), Wave 4 (2009), Wave 5 (2010), Wave 6 (2011). Source: Universal McCann: Social Media Tracker 2012

Since 2010, the number of social network profiles being created by active internet users has slowed down. Only countries such as Germany which are lagging behind the more mature social media markets are still seeing significant growth on social networks (see exhibit 1) and other social platforms.

 

 

 

 

Exhibit 2: Number of social contacts by platform. Source: Universal McCann: Social Media Tracker 2012

However, while the number of profiles doesn’t grow as fast as it used to, the time spent on managing those profiles is still on the rise, as the number of social contacts managed continues to grow (see exhibit 2).

 

 

 

 

Exhibit 3: Media consumption by channel. Source: Universal McCann: Social Media Tracker 2012

As a result, users are spending more time socializing online than ever before (see exhibit 3).

 

 

 

 

 

 

Social networking means different things to different countries

Exhibit 4: Social networking focus by country. Source: Universal McCann: Social Media Tracker 2012

While social networking is always about sharing an interest with others, it is to some degree dependent on the cultural context what that actually means: e.g., the Chinese look for education and self-improvement, whereas the Germans look for a sense of belonging (see exhibit 4).

 

 

 

 

Privacy concerns in balance with readiness to share

Exhibit 5: Sharing personal data and privacy concerns. Source: Universal McCann: Social Media Tracker 2012

With users exposing more of their personal data on social networks, it doesn’t come as a surprise that there is also more concern with regards to data privacy. At the same time, users have become so attached to the habit of social networking that they are prepared to accept a certain level of risk (see exhibit 5).

Brand websites losing importance

Exhibit 6: Active internet users who visited a brand website within last 6 months. Source: Universal McCann: Social Media Tracker 2012

With social media activities consuming most of the time users spend on the web, brand websites are losing importance across all age groups, but particularly with young users (see exhibit 6). Interestingly, this decline of brand websites is not as distinct in Germany as it is elsewhere.

 

Exhibit 7: What applications do for users. Source: Universal McCann: Social Media Tracker 2012

With their offering mostly limited to information and commerce, brand websites don’t present many opportunities for engagement with users, at least when compared to social media platforms (see exhibit 7).

 

 

 

 

 

 

Brand interactions mean different things to different industries

Exhibit 8: Which interaction would make you feel closer to the company? Source: Universal McCann: Social Media Tracker 2012

Interestingly, when asked what kind of interaction users would appreciate when communicating with brands, they respond differently from industry to industry depending on the targeted outcome (see exhibit 8).

 

 

 

PC, laptop and mobile phones still the main devices to access the web

Exhibit 9: Devices used to access the internet. Source: Universal McCann: Social Media Tracker 2012

PC, laptop, smartphone, tablet, mobile phone, e-book reader, internet connected TV, games console, portable MP3/video player, portable games console, the number of devices allowing for access to the internet is growing. However,PC, laptop and mobile phones are still the main ways to access the internet (see exhibit 9). Of course, this is expected to change as the smartphone penetration is growing rapidly with tablets also catching up.

Exhibit 10: Devices by activity. Source: Universal McCann: Social Media Tracker 2012

When comparing how the devices are being used, it already begins to show how smartphones are strong when it comes to searching, browsing, locating or reading news online (see exhibit 10).

 

 

 

Georg Kolb

 

Number of Germans actively managing a social network profile ranked 6 worldwide

Series on Germany, post #3

Social networks have become a better indicator for social media activities than any other particular tool, since users increasingly tend to aggregate many of their activities such as blogging or video sharing on their social network. That’s one of the more important insights in Universal McCann’s latest report.

According to their latest Social Media Tracker, the number of German active internet users managing a social network profile is at 11.5 m.  That’s rank 6 worldwide, three ranks lower than Germany’s total number of active users, but still pretty high:

  1. China: 111 m
  2. US: 57.8 m
  3. Brazil: 15.6 m
  4. UK: 12.1 m
  5. Korea: 11.9 m
  6. Germany: 11.5 m
  7. France and Japan: 10.2 m
  8. India: 9.6 m

Importance of local networks

It is worth noting, that local networks play a big role in Germany. When Facebook entered the market, local players had a pretty significant head start. In particular “Wer-kennt-wen” (translated “Who-knows-whom”), a network for the mainstream audience now owned by TV network RTL, and studiVZ, a student network now owned by publisher Holtzbrinck, had attracted millions of users. It probably didn’t help that Facebook sued studiVZ in a US court alleging it was just a local clone of Facebook. It probably did help, though, that Facebook was faster with innovation and new functionalities for users. Holger Schmidt reported how Facebook managed to grow its reach by 50 % in an impressive run-up between March and July 2009 and finally take the lead in the German market (see exhibit 1).

The situation is different when it comes to professional networks. With a unique audience of 3.56 m, local leader Xing is eight times bigger than global leader LinkedIn, and Xing is still growing whereas LinkedIn stays flat (see exhibit 2). Twitter doesn’t have a local competitor in Germany. While it’s still on a low level compared to the US, it enjoyed significant growth in 2009. Nielsen found that its reach increased from nearly 1.2 m to just under 2 m between March and July 2009 (see exhibit 3). Of course, there is a difference between reach and active users. Thomas Pfeiffer calculated that Twitter had approx. 28.000 active German users back in March, 145.000 in July. That is rapid growth, albeit on a low level.

See also related posts:

Exhibit 5: Social networks in Germany. Sources: Nielsen: Usage at work and home. Graphics: F.A.Z. Graphics Kaiser. Translated by Georg Kolb

Exhibit 1: Social networks in Germany. Sources: Nielsen: Usage at work and home. Graphics: F.A.Z. Graphics Kaiser. Translated by Georg Kolb

Exhibit 4: Professional networks in Germany. Sources: Nielsen: Usage at work and at home. Graphics: F.A.Z. Graphics Kaiser. Translated by Georg Kolb

Exhibit 2: Professional networks in Germany. Sources: Nielsen: Usage at work and at home. Graphics: F.A.Z. Graphics Kaiser. Translated by Georg Kolb

Exhibit 5: Twitter in Germany. Sources: Nielsen: Usage at work and at home. Graphics: F.A.Z. Graphics Kaiser. Translated by Georg Kolb

Exhibit 3: Twitter in Germany. Sources: Nielsen: Usage at work and at home. Graphics: F.A.Z. Graphics Kaiser. Translated by Georg Kolb

 

Germans were late to social media but caught up in 2007/2008

Exhibit 1: Germany in Universal McCann's latest  Social Media Tracker, Wave 4, July 2009. Wave 3 was in Mar 08, Wave 2 in Jun 07, Wave 1 in Sep 06

Exhibit 1: Germany in Universal McCann's latest Social Media Tracker, Wave 4, July 2009. Wave 3 was in Mar 08, Wave 2 in Jun 07, Wave 1 in Sep 06

Series on Germany, post #2

When it comes to social media, adoption rates on almost any platform in Germany have long been much lower than in other countries. That suddenly changed between 2007 and 2008.

Universal McCann’s Social Media Tracker reported that between June 2007 and March 2008 the percentage of active internet users in Germany reading blogs more than tripled from 15 % to 55 %, also those writing blogs jumped from 8 % to 28 % and those creating a social network profile more than doubled from 19 % to 41 %  (see exhibit 1).

This rapid increase was also confirmed by Nielsen’s Global Faces and Networked Places in March 2009. Nielsen found that within their global study Germany had seen the greatest increase in online reach of social networks between December 2007 and December 2008 (see exhibit 2).

Of course, growth rates don’t tell the whole story. Looking at the absolute numbers, Germany is still somewhat behind, but not as far as some people think. In the next post we will compare social network activities in absolute numbers by country.

See also related posts:

Exhibit 2: Nielsen: Global Faces and Networked Places, March 2009. Increase in member communities (social networks and blogs)

Exhibit 2: Nielsen: Global Faces and Networked Places, March 2009. Increase in member communities (social networks and blogs)